Friday, March 22, 2019

My Interview with Tony Breeden


What is your name and/or pen name? 

Tony Breeden. I’ve occasionally written under the pen name Sirius Knott. 

What genre do you write? 

I write science fiction. My current subgenres are superhero fiction and LitRPG. At least one of my books (Johnny Came Home) also qualifies as a work of apologetics fiction. To be fair, my Impworld/Otherworld series could be described as a genre-bending blend of scifi, fantasy and LitRPG. 

I also write non-fiction. I have a book on the creation/evolution debate (Defending Genesis) that complements the material in my superhero novel (Johnny Came Home). I also have a book called Strangers and Aliens that explores UFOs and the possibility of extraterrestrial life from a Christian POV. 

What made you want to be a writer? 

I got the writing bug as a child when my late aunt Sharon helped me make my very first book. It was about dinosaurs, vigorously illustrated in crayon. I continued writing as a child and on into my high school years. A lot of those early works inform my published books. For a long time, it was just a personal hobby. 

The one day I was looking for a good book to read and just couldn’t find what I was looking for. 

I was browsing local Christian bookstores, just bored out of my mind. With few exceptions, I was looking an endless sea of romance novels, marketed at women. I’m a guy, so I’m into science fiction, fantasy and action thrillers. I remember thinking, “Why should I be forced to get the stuff I actually enjoy reading from secular bookstores in novels written from a non- or even anti-Christian worldview?” 

So I started writing the kind of books I wanted to read. My first book, Johnny Came Home, was published in 2012. 

What do you use to keep yourself inspired while writing? 

I never know how to answer that question. My mind is filled with a ridiculous amount of books, cartoon series and movies. I grew up in the Eighties, so… Well, there’s a lot going on up there at any given time. My imagination has always been on overdrive. Just add coffee. 

How do you feel about the writing community as a whole? 

Most of the people I associate with are just great. We encourage each other, critique each other’s work, cry on each other’s shoulders, promote each other and trade bad puns. Bad puns are the best! It’s more of a spirit of comradery than competition. 

Have you or will you be willing to collaborate with other authors in the future? 

It depends on the project. I’ve considered developing a shared world and inviting other authors to come be a part of it, rather like the Dragonlance saga was developed beyond the first six books. That would be fun. 

Tell us about your book and if it’s upcoming or already published. 

Soulbright is Book 2 of the Impworld/Otherworld series. It was published in July. This tale involves Copernicus Gallows, a monster hunter played by Marcus Wayne, as he plays the universe’s most popular sword and sorcery game on GameComm’s terraformed alien world. The book is a work of LitRPG, sort of like Warcraft meets Ready Player One. You see both sides of the game: the player and the character he plays. In this case, dragons are actually biological robots and the magic is facilitated by ubiquitous nanites. The game is part LARP (live action role play) and part reality TV. 

Copper is out to find the next piece of an artifact that has the power to end his most powerful foe: Impunus, the brat prince of vampyres. Unfortunately, to continue his on-going quest, he must brave the Accursed City of Eternal Night, foil an ancient prophecy and best Impunus’ chief rival, the powerful vampyre known as Corpulus.He must do all of this while fighting against betrayal, a secret that could end his career, and fickle popularity pointsin the real world. 

I should warn you that my favorite Christmas movie is Die Hard. Which is to say that my books tend to action-packed. If this sounds like your kind of book, strap yourself in and enjoy the ride. 

You can view the book trailer on my Youtube channel: https://youtu.be/31gMsN1qiZg 

Is your book or upcoming book an eBook, paperback, or both? 

Soulbright is available in both ebook and paperback formats. 

Is this your first book? 

This is my 7th book, my 5th work of fiction. 

Are you planning to write more? 

I have loads more to write. My next published book will likely be a sequel to Dreadknights. Dreadknights was intended as a prequel to the Impworld/Otherworld series, but the protagonist (Christine Johannsen aka Ogress Bloodskull) has become so popular that I gave her a sequel. Bloodskull brings our eponymous hero into contact with the characters from Luckbane as the Dreadknights of Outland find themselves working for the Impworld/Otherworld series’ biggest villain. 

I have a few more projects in the worlds as well, including a few more nonfiction books, a vampyre tale, more books in the Impworld/Otherworld series, and a sequel to Johnny Came Home involving Sherlock Holmes. I’ve also promised my kids that I will eventually finish my children’s book, The T-rex and the Fuzzy Bunnies. 

So, yes. 

Is there anything you would say to other writers, that want to write and publish a book? 

Yes. Write. Write every day. Write for at least five minutes every day. I’ve written about a book per year with that philosophy. 

Where can my readers find your book and how they can follow you on social media? Leave only links that you want open to the public. 





 

Thank you so much, Tony, for sharing with us. I can relate to you and why you write. Just the other day someone asked me, “Why do you write Christian Science Fiction and Fantasy?” And I replied, “Because I can’t find the stories I want.”

I invite everyone to follow and check out Tony’s books from the links above.
As always, Happy Reading and Writing Everyone

G. D. Talbot

Friday, March 15, 2019

My Interview with KC Frantzen and May


What is your name and/or pen name? 

We are co-authors - KC Frantzen and May, a small Schnauzer! 

What genre do you write? 

Several years ago we used to say "middle grade adventure" but so many young adults, parents and grands enjoyed them too, now we say our books are for animal lovers 8 and up. 

What made you want to be a writer? 

KC has been writing since 5th grade but got the bug after winning a school-wide writing contest. These days, it's what God has called her to do. As a rescue dog, May thought telling her story might help humans who started off in a bad place too. That with God's grace and a healthy dose of spunk, plus good decisions, things turn out for the best. She always says, "Opportunity is on the way!" 

What do you use to keep yourself inspired while writing? 

Travel inspires us, though the international kind we discuss in our books isn't feasible for May in real life. Still, we pore over different places we can use to tell a story. We like to have a theme and overall message for each book, then weave lots of mischief and challenges to keep pages turning. Most of what happens in the first book May on the Way: How I Become a K9 Spy is actually true in real life! Books 2, 3, 4 are known for being accurate, even down to street names and real life events, but they don't necessarily happen to May. 

One thing for sure, May loves to tell her own story. They are all written in first dog.

How do you feel about the writing community as a whole? 

When we started ten years ago, we were astounded by the assistance so many others offered. Writing can be a fairly lonely business. As has been said, BICHOK is a must - Bottom in chair, hands on keyboard. This must be done alone, or if you're co-authoring, side by side with at least one if not both working quietly. (The other may/may not be snoozing at any given moment.) So having support online and at conferences is such a blessing. 

Have you or will you be willing to collaborate with other authors in the future? 

It's so much fun to collaborate! May and KC brainstorm a potential story, then KC types (since May finds it difficult to type without thumbs) the rough draft in the computer using the Snowflake Method. Once it's formulated about 3/4 of the way, we work together to edit and polish. Then submit to our first readers and work on writing the end. Then rewrites, submission to another batch of beta readers, many more rewrites, then off the manuscript goes to our wonderful editor, Sandra Byrd. Once her comments come in, we polish and rewrite more, then we begin work with the illustrator. (We've used 3 different illustrators so far.) As those pieces come in, we submit the nearly final manuscript to our proofreaders and back to the beta readers for final read throughs... Once that's finished, it's off to the formatter and finally the printer! Wshew! 

Tell us about your book and if it’s upcoming or already published. 

We have a fully illustrated 4 book series already published in hardcover and e-book. In the first story, May is rescued from a really bad situation, and moves to the home of a grouchy Labrador. Shortly thereafter, the entire family moves to rural Tennessee. One day May is out where she's not supposed to be, and sees something she's not supposed to see, and that starts her journey to be a K9 spy. In book 2, May Finds a Way: Peril in Paris, May is in K9 spy boot camp where an exercise goes awry, and she's dognapped and ends up in Paris. She teams up with a feral French cat who lives in a cemetery to thwart an evil plot. May Leads the Way: Trouble Near Tofino, Book 3, finds our heroine encountering enemy dolphins and nuclear submarines while helping rescue her family. In our latest, May Saves the Day: Situation in St. Petersburg, May is ambushed! As the back cover says: 

Undercover missions are challenging, especially with a sinister chef and a Cheetah on deck. 

Agent May returns, working incognito to protect young delegates of the international Mastermind contest as they travel from Tallinn to St. Petersburg and beyond.

An elite K9 Squad and Cassidy, an unforeseen Schnauzer ally, join her to fend off Falcons and skilled Russian spies… Leading to a situation she hoped never to encounter. 

Are you planning to write more? 

Many have asked us to! For now, we are content visiting students in public and private schools, where we introduce our stories and teach a writing lesson, all free of charge. We simply ask for travel expenses and the opportunity to sell our books and coordinating plush toys at a discount. There's more information on our website about that. So far, we've visited schools in CO, GA, TN, TX and even Calgary, Alberta. We also appear at events held at libraries and craft fairs. 

Is there anything you would say to other writers, that want to write and publish a book? 

Sure! Get your story on paper! Editing a blank page is impossible, plus no one wants to read a blank page. Tell the story God wants you and only you to tell. Then, research the actual craft of writing through books, online courses, in person conferences and seminars. Be sure to check out online resources such as http://seekerville.blogspot.com and others. The writing community, we've found, has been so helpful. 

The main thing is, get started! 

May wants you to know that a cozy spot to snuggle and edit, and delicious treats, are musts also. BOL! 

Where can my readers find your book and how they can follow you on social media? 

Thank you for asking! Please visit our website:  www.maythek9spy.com where you'll also find a link to Facebook. While you're on the website, listen to and read the first chapter of each book and order e-books and hardcover versions. Be sure to let us know what you think. 

By the way, our first story is free in e-book on Amazon, Kobo and Nook. Check it               out!
And do us a HUGE favor, please. When you're finished reading the books, leave an honest review. It helps us to improve our stories and for other readers find us. 

Thanks again! Hope to see you online or at a school near you soon!


May on the Way: How I Become a K9 Spy

May Finds a Way: Peril in Paris

May Leads the Way: Trouble Near Tofino

May Saves the Day: Situation in St. Petersburg 

Facebook: https: //www.facebook.com/MaytheK9Spy 

Shop e-books here:  https://maythek9spy.com/ebooks/ 

Thank you so much KC and May. When I was in elementary school I won an award for writing. My family was not supportive of this so I never thought I could be a writer, until I was almost 40 years old. So I really love the fact that you go out to schools, and help with inspiring young minds.

You rock for doing that.

I really hope everyone that loves animals and is 8 and up, will check out KC and May’s books, and then follow them on social media.

Happy Reading and Writing Everyone

G. D. Talbot

Friday, March 8, 2019

My Interview with Andrew L Gardner



What is your name and/or pen name?

Andrew L Gardner, I don’t use a pen name. I never really thought about that to be honest.

What genre do you write?

Always a hard question, that one. Purely from the point of view that every story has sub plots, twists and nuances that deviate from a given genre. I guess mine would be described as a crime thriller suspense. I like to use a contemporary setting, one that is familiar to readers but with a twist. A ‘suppose we look at this from this angle?’ It’s not really dystopian as it is actually happening, if you look hard enough.
Crime is a fascinating topic and one has a lot of variations in the modern world, it’s not always murder or theft. I also like to keep things fast paced with unexpected twists and turns that throw the protagonist (and antagonist). Their emotions, wants and desires are tested, as in real life, and I want to question that.

What made you want to be a writer?

When I left full time education I yearned to write. For a living. What was called ‘Composition’ but is now called ‘creative writing’ was my most enjoyable subject.
I could lose myself in the world I created with words. Being an author was not as easy then as it is now. It usually entailed having reams of manuscripts jammed into a filing cabinet or under a single bed. More than likely in a dimly lit room at the top of a winding rickety staircase in some tenement block. Often in a less salubrious part of town!
This didn’t seem a particularly enjoyable way to earn a crust, so I leaned toward journalism. My parents had other ideas.
Journalism was a far too precarious venture and I was steered towards a trade. Apprenticeships were the way forward, they thought.
They were right, but it was creatively stifling.
But for me creativity is not enough. I could paint to be creative. There has to be a Raison d’etre.
And I found it while working on the manuscript.
That was back in 2016, a time of immense events on both sides of the Atlantic. In America Trump had confounded all the pundits and become 45th President of the USA. Closer to home in the UK people voted in great numbers to leave the EU en-masse.
But other issues also came to the fore.
Britain had social problems that were not being concealed any more. The political elite, household names from entertainment and sport were being exposed as being a hotbed of corruption and sleaze.
I had found the back story. Now I could create an exiting and fast paced thriller that grips the reader while simultaneously raising awareness of what is happening in our world (without preaching).

What do you use to keep yourself inspired while writing?

Our fast moving world, I also con tribute to a small number of news aggregators, some of this seeps into my story lines.

How do you feel about the writing community as a whole?

The established publishing world seem to be missing a trick. Concentrating on a narrow view of genres, when there is a kaleidoscope that is available. This is where independent authors fill a much neededvacuum. They are also extremely supportive of each other.

Have you or will you be willing to collaborate with other authors in the future?

Absolutely.

Tell us about your book and if it’s upcoming or already published.

I have published a trilogy and have released it also as book 1, 2 and 3.
The RealLiveNews network had just broken a BIG story. It was gaining traction and everyone was waking up to the dreadful truth that had been hidden in plain sight. It involved a people trafficking ring that implicated some important movers and shakers. Many were household names- some from the world of show business, others were in government.
The trouble was these movers and shakers had a lot of influence.
Alexander Day and his glamorous colleague Lydia Foster need to stay ahead of those who wanted to silence them. Possibly permanently.
It is now no longer for them to stay in the UK, now no longer part of the EU. They are forced to go on the run, overseas. Even that may not be far enough as they find out how far reaching their hunters influence is. A deadly man hunt ensues.
Just as the crime family is about to spring the trap shut and end it all, help comes from an unexpected quarter.
But will it be enough? More importantly, will it be in time?

Is your book or upcoming book an eBook, paperback, or both?

It is available as both and is free on kindle unlimited. I am also looking at publishing it on iTunes.

Is this your first book?

Yes it is.

Are you planning to write more?

I have a sequel lined up called ‘Personality Crisis’ where the protagonist has to go under cover and experiences immense psychological pressure avoiding having his cover blown. He is investigating a secret society!
Before that I will be publishing a short story collection.

Is there anything you would say to other writers, that want to write and publish a book?

Yes, don’t be put off by the stigma of self publishing. You have total control over the content of your story, something you don’t get with a large publishing house. Also when writing, be disciplined. Be strict with your time, after all it is a job. Oh, and finally don’t go on social media- it is the biggest time vacuum there is!

Where can my readers find your book and how they can follow you on social media? Leave only links that you want open to the public.

My author page at Amazon is https://www.amazon.com/author/algwriter
I look forward to seeing you all there and thanks for the interview Greg.

Thank you so much, Andrew, for sharing with us. I really enjoyed your encouraging words about self-publishing.
I invite everyone to follow Andrew and check out his book by using the links above.
As Always, Happy Reading and Writing Everyone
G. D. Talbot

Friday, March 1, 2019

My Interview with Steven J Pemberton


What is your name and/or pen name? 

Steven J Pemberton 

What genre do you write? 

I mainly write fantasy novels. I’ve also written a science fiction novel, a children’s book and a few short stories. 

What made you want to be a writer? 

My father was a librarian and my mother was a teacher, so it was probably inevitable that I would grow up loving books. My mother wrote short stories and had a few published in magazines, which inspired me. What made me want to write fantasy, specifically, was reading The Hobbit when I was off sick from school. 

What do you use to keep yourself inspired while writing? 

The inspiration for most of my stories comes about over many years. I have a wordprocessor document where I write down anything that I think might be useful in a story – interesting news items, quotations, jokes, character names, “what if?” questions, cool plot twists – anything, really. Every so often (usually when I’m bored or stuck with the story I’m currently writing) I read through this document and comment on entries, or look for connections between entries (which I might have written years apart). Gradually, enough material for a story comes together. 

But inspiration on its own won’t let you write a book, unless your books are much shorter than mine or you write much faster than I do. It is, as the logicians say, necessary but not sufficient. It will get you started, and will sometimes get you out of a tricky situation, but over the longer term, determination and self-discipline are more valuable. What allowed me to write nine books over the last twelve years was firstly, deciding that I would write something every day, then once that had become a habit, setting myself a target for the number of words to write each day. I figured I could spend an hour writing each day, and that when I put my mind to it, I could write 500 words in that hour, so 500 words became my daily target. It doesn’t sound like much (in a paperback, it’s around one-and-a-half to two pages), but over the weeks and months, it adds up. 

How do you feel about the writing community as a whole? 

Most of them are all right ;-) I’m in a couple of writing groups, online and in real life, and I’ve found the members supportive and helpful. My writing improved a lot when I joined a critique group. 

Outside the small worlds of the writing groups, I think there is a sense of community, a sense that “we’re all in this together.” We’re not competitors, or we don’t have to be. A few badly-behaved authors, especially on the indie side, give the rest a bad name, but their tactics usually don’t work over the long term. Any individual misbehaving author tends not to be a problem for very long. 

Have you or will you be willing to collaborate with other authors in the future? 

I take “collaborate” to mean “co-write”, rather than “edit”, “critique” or “toss ideas around”, all of which I willingly do. 

I co-wrote a few radio and film scripts many years ago, but have never co-written a book. I can’t see myself doing it in the future either. Writing one takes too long for me to be confident that someone else will be willing to work with me for the whole time, plus which I like being in control of the process. If I was to co-write a novel, it would have to be one I really wanted to write (!) but which I felt I couldn’t currently do justice to. I’d also need a good reason for not simply putting this one aside until my skills had improved enough to write it on my own and writing another book in the meantime. (Remember that big “ideas” document I mentioned above – if I think I’m not ready to write one book, I have plenty of others I could write.) 

Tell us about your book and if it’s upcoming or already published. 

My most recent novel, The Reluctant Dragonrider, is the second book in my Dragonrider series. It follows on from the first book, The Accidental Dragonrider, but can be read on its own, as it’s not a direct sequel – the protagonist is the daughter of the protagonist of the first book.            

The blurb for The Reluctant Dragonrider is as follows – It’s been forty years since Tiwan’s father Iko convinced a dragon to save their village. Now the dragons are back, and they want Tiwan’s help in a war against an enemy in their world’s oceans. But she’s just a child, so what could she do? The dragons threaten to invade the humans’ world if they lose the war. Tiwan reluctantly agrees to go on a spying mission for them, even though she risks being lost in the dragons’ world forever. 

The Dragonrider series came into existence in a rather roundabout way. Many years ago, a member of a mailing list I was in (remember them?) had a quotation in her signature block, “Do not meddle in the affairs of dragons, for you are crunchy and taste good with ketchup.” (This, of course, is a riff on a quotation from Tolkien, “Do not meddle in the affairs of wizards, for they are subtle and quick to anger.”) I thought I might be able to get a story out of it. I wrote about 600 words of a man on a hilltop who’d just summoned a dragon and was trying to convince it to help him. After that, I got stuck, because I hadn’t yet learned to wait until I had a few of the story’s key scenes or turning points clear in my head. Those 600 words languished on my hard drive while I wrote many more words and many more stories. One day as I was writing another book (The Mirrors of Elangir), I mentioned in passing that one of the warring nations in it used dragons as airborne cavalry. I immediately realised that if I took my 600-word beginning and set it in the same world as The Mirrors of Elangir (many years later), I would be able to continue the story. I now had a setting, some history, and (most importantly) some motivation for the dragon’s behaviour. 

I initially intended The Accidental Dragonrider to be a standalone book, and gave the ending a definite sense of finality. But I try not to close off options completely, and left a few loose ends and unsolved puzzles to allow myself a sequel if I ever wanted to write one. Then it proved unexpectedly popular, and I decided I should write a sequel. (I swear this never occurred to me when I was writing, but it turns out there are a lot of people who like reading about dragons.) 

Will there be a third Dragonrider book? I have some ideas for it, and I put a few things into The Reluctant Dragonrider that could connect to it, but I have at least two other books I want to write first, so it’ll be a while before I return to Iko and Tiwan and the dragons. 

Is your book or upcoming book an eBook, paperback, or both? 

All my books are available as ebooks and paperbacks. I’m also in the process of releasing them as audiobooks. I’m about halfway through my back catalogue at the moment. 

Is this your first book? 

I’ve published nine books so far. As well as the two Dragonrider books, I’ve published The Barefoot Healer (a series of four young adult fantasy novels), The Mirrors of Elangir (a young adult fantasy novel), Escape Velocity (a science fiction novel for adults) and Simon and the Birthday Wish (a children’s book). 

Are you planning to write more? 

Officially my next book will be a sequel to The Mirrors of Elangir. Then I want to write another science fiction novel, set in a far-future dystopia, then maybe the third Dragonrider book. Somewhere along the way I might write a sequel to Simon and the Birthday Wish. I’ve also got a half-finished book of short stories, though one of those is currently 35,000 words, so I might pull that out into a separate novel or novella. After that… who knows? I don’t think I’m in any danger of using up the entries in my ideas document. 

Is there anything you would say to other writers, that want to write and publish a book? 

There’s a great deal I could say, but I’ll try to keep it brief. 

Firstly, if your main reason for wanting to write isn’t that you love writing, find something else to do with your spare time. It’s not wrong to want to be rich and famous through writing, but so few people achieve it that if it’s your main motive, you’re likely to end up bitter that you wasted years chasing a dream that wasn’t going to come true. If you write because you love to write, then regardless of whether any success comes from it, you’ll have enjoyed the time you spent writing. 

Secondly, read a lot, and not just in your chosen genre(s). Mostly, read good stuff, to learn from it, but read some bad stuff too, so you can be confident of knowing the difference. I can usually tell when a writer doesn’t read enough, because they ask questions whose answers they would naturally soak up if they read a lot. (Questions like “How long should a chapter be?”, “Can I use swearwords?”, “Give me a long list of synonyms for ‘said,’ because I think writing ‘he/she said’ after every line of dialogue is boring.”) 

Thirdly, write a lot, mostly in your chosen genre(s), but don’t be afraid to experiment. If you want to write fiction that you expect strangers to read and enjoy, you need to write, on average, a million words for practice. Finish what you start, even if you stop enjoying writing it. Many writers abandon a piece of writing when it becomes boring, believing that the problem is that they haven’t found the right story to write. And maybe they haven’t, but it’s more likely related to what I said about not being able to stay inspired for a long time. Every story becomes boring to write if you spend long enough working on it. You simply have to trust that if you keep working on it, your mood will improve enough to make the story enjoyable again. 

Fourthly, show what you think is your best work to people you believe are better writers than you. When you’ve finished crying and swearing over how they tore your precious baby to pieces, use what they told you to edit the piece to make it better, and make your next piece better to begin with. I believe there’s a limit to how much you can improve any one piece of writing from where it started – you either reach the current limit of your abilities or stop seeing its flaws. When you reach that point, or perhaps before, it’s time to start a new piece. If everybody you show the story to says it’s wonderful and has no flaws, find some new people to ask about it – not because the current ones are wrong, but because you won’t learn anything from them. 

Not all advice is useful. Many writers, when commenting on your story, will try to turn it into the story they would have written. (This isn’t always intentional, and often they don’t realise they’re doing it.) You should pay the most attention to the advice that will help you to tell the story you want to tell in the best way you can. Also pay attention to problems that more than one person points out. There’s a saying, “What I tell you three times is true.” If three or more people independently point out the same problem, the odds are that they’re right, and you should either fix it or have a good reason not to. (“They don’t understand me” is usually not a good reason...) 

Where can my readers find your book and how they can follow you on social media? Leave only links that you want open to the public. 

The Reluctant Dragonrider is currently available in ebook and paperback, and might also be available as an audiobook by the time you read this. You can find the ebook and paperback on Amazon at these links: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0783HDB8Z (USA) https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B0783HDB8Z (UK) or your local Amazon store. The ebook is currently exclusive to Amazon. The ISBN for the paperback is 978 197 985 7642, which might help you to find it if you want to look for it at other retailers. 

The best place to find information about my books and where to buy them is my website, http://www.pembers.net. 

You can follow me on Twitter, @sjpemb. 


I have a YouTube channel at https://www.youtube.com/user/pembersbcc, where I post readings, trailers and behind-the-scenes videos about my books. 

I recently started a Facebook author page, which is at https://www.facebook.com/StevenJPembertonAuthor/. 

Thank you for reading this far, and thank you G D Talbot for giving me the opportunity to speak to you.

No thank you, Steven, for sharing with us. I really enjoyed when you pointed out using “What if” questions when writing. I do the same in my writing and I suggest to other fiction authors to do the same.

I hope everyone will check out Steven’s books and follow him on social media.

As Always Happy Reading and Writing Everyone

G. D. Talbot

Friday, February 15, 2019

My Interview With Michelle Bolanger




What is your name and/or pen name? 

My name is Michelle Bolanger, and I publish under the same name. 

What genre do you write? 

It depends on the day. I have published three urban fantasy romance novels, and two Christian fiction. I also have two high fantasy series in progress, and a contemporary romance. I’m a bit of a genre hopper. 

What made you want to be a writer? 

My love of reading. Being sucked into another world by words on a page is one of the most exiting experiences ever. Authors are able to create worlds, set your emotions on fire or freeze you with fear. All with the power of their imagination. I wanted that kind of power!
Just kidding. I read like a starving woman most of the time, and it’s my belief that eventually, when you put that much creativity in, it’s only a matter of time before you can’t help but let out your own.
 

What do you use to keep yourself inspired while writing? 

I am very visually driven. When I get stuck or if I need a bit of inspiration to keep a scene moving, I search Pinterest or Google images for ideas. 

How do you feel about the writing community as a whole? 

I LOVE IT! In my experience, the writing community is one of the most welcoming and encouraging groups I have ever been a part of. Most of the authors, bloggers, and industry professionals I have had the pleasure to meet are more than willing to share their wisdom, tips and tricks with us newbies. 

Have you or will you be willing to collaborate with other authors in the future? 

I haven’t collaborated in the sense of co-writing a story with someone, but if the right opportunity and co-author came along, I’d be willing to give it a try. 

Tell us about your book and if it’s upcoming or already published. 

My most recent book, Safe Cages, published on August 7, 2018. It is about two men who are desperately in love with each other when they come face to face with the love an acceptance of God, and His love changes everything. 

Is your book or upcoming book an eBook, paperback, or both? 

Safe Cages is available in both ebook and paperback. 

Is this your first book? 

It is my fifth book, the second book in a set of novels called The Challenged Faith Novels. 

Are you planning to write more? 

I sure hope so! I have outlines for one more Challenged Faith novel in addition to the fantasies and romances I mentioned earlier. 

Is there anything you would say to other writers, that want to write and publish a book? 

Read. A LOT. Read outside your genre.
Write. A LOT. Write crap you never intend to publish, you might surprise
yourself.
Focus on finishing. You’ll be tempted to jump to a new story when it gets hard. Don’t. The new one won’t be any easier to finish. 

Where can my readers find your book and how they can follow you on social media? Leave only links that you want open to the public. 

You can find my books on Amazon, iBooks, Kobo, and Barnes and Noble.

You can find me on Facebook:



I send a newsletter once a month or so with updates, sales, and contests. You can sign up at the bottom of my website or from my Facebook page.

Thank you so much, Michelle, for sharing with us. I really love the idea of using images to keep inspiration flowing. I’m sure some of my followers will be using that trick.

I hope everyone will check out Michelle’s books and follow her on social media by using the links above. And remember if you like her books, make sure to share with your friends and family.

Happy Reading and Writing Everyone

G. D. Talbot